What might constitute creditor harassment?
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What might constitute creditor harassment?

| Feb 18, 2021 | Bankruptcy, Creditor Harassment

It may come as no surprise that collection agencies might deploy a variety of tactics while attempting to collect on past due accounts. Although many individuals in Georgia who struggle with debt may feel that dealing with creditors is simply a part of the process, some might not know when the tactics involved turn from acceptable to unlawful. Understanding how to identify creditor harassment could prove vital to preparing to protect one’s rights and interests through the proper means.

Identifying harassment

According to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, creditor harassment can come in numerous forms. The FDCPA states that creditors are prohibited from using certain tactics, such as using offensive language or seeking repayment by issuing threats. In addition, creditors cannot make frequent attempts to contact for the sole reason of annoying or abusing debtors, as this also constitutes harassment.

When contacting debtors, collection agencies are also prohibited from refusing to provide certain types of information such as the name of their company or accurate account details. Any attempts to mislead debtors or use false titles or identities could also fall under creditor harassment. Knowing what types of behavior that are not acceptable and border on or constitute as harassment could prove helpful, but it can also be a complex endeavor.

Protecting one’s rights

Individuals who feel they have been subjected to creditor harassment may still have concerns over how best to approach the situation. Fortunately, there are attorneys who can examine the situation a person is facing and provide insight on all his or her available options. An attorney in Georgia can work toward taking the necessary steps to protect a client’s legal rights and provide insight in making informed choices about how best to approach his or her current financial circumstances.

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